Articles

Stanford, CA— Photosynthesis provides fixed carbon and energy for nearly all life on Earth, yet many aspects of this fascinating process remain mysterious. For example, little is known about how it is regulated in response to changes in light intensity. More fundamentally, we do not know the full list of the parts of the molecular machines that perform photosynthesis in any organism. A type of single-cell green algae called Chlamydomonas...
Stanford, CA— Evolution is based on diversity, and sexual reproduction is key to creating a diverse population that secures competitiveness in nature. Plants had to solve a problem: they needed to find ways to spread their genetic material. Flying pollinators—insects, birds, and bats—were nature’s solution. Charles Darwin’s “abominable mystery” highlighted the coincidence of flowering plant and insect diversification about 120 million years...

The Nitrogen Kick-Off meeting was held in San Francisco, February 27-March 1, 2014. Devaki Bhaya of the Carnegie Institution was the local host for the event. The meeting was jointly funded by the NSF (US) and BBSRC (UK), with the long term vision of addressing the challenge of providing nitrogen to meet the growing global demand for food.

Stanford, CA— As every gardner knows, nitrogen is crucial for a plant’s growth. But nitrogen absorption is inefficient. This means that on the scale of food crops, adding significant levels of nitrogen to the soil through fertilizer presents a number of problems, particularly river and groundwater pollution. As a result, finding a way to improve nitrogen uptake in agricultural products could improve yields and decrease risks to environmental...
Stanford, CA—Carnegie’s Li-Quing Chen, recipient of a Tansley Medal for Excellence in Plant Science, announced late last year, is honored with an editorial and minireview in New Phytologist this month. The journal’s Tansley medal is awarded each year in recognition of “outstanding contribution to research in plant science by an individual in the early stages of their career.” Each recipient authors a minireview about the subject area of...
Each year, the journal The Scientist ranks academic research institutions across the US. This year, Plant Biology is among the top 5. We will make every effort to keep this place among the most attractive workplaces in academia, which means to continue to thrive for a supporting a creative and highly productive work environment. http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/36737/title/Best-Places-to-Work-Academia-2013/ 
Stanford, CA—Inside every plant cell, a cytoskeleton provides an interior scaffolding to direct construction of the cell’s walls, and thus the growth of the organism as a whole. Environmental and hormonal signals that modulate cell growth cause reorganization of this scaffolding. New research led by Carnegie’s David Ehrhardt provides surprising evidence as to how this reorganization process works, with important evidence as to how the...
On Nov 2nd, we held a symposium honoring Dr. Winslow Briggs, the staff member and former Director of the department of Biology here on our campus in Stanford. The symposium was attended by distinguished international speakers, who gave keynote presentations. The presentations focused on light perception and signaling in plants, honoring the fundamental discoveries made by Dr. Briggs, who continues to carry out important scientific research...

The Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Plant Biology is hosting it's first retreat in 9 years at the Tresidder Oak Room on Stanford campus November 1st from 9AM-8PM. The event will include a poster session, vision talks from all plant faculty and keynote addresses from Alexander Jones of the Frommer lab and Winslow Briggs, Emeritus director of the department.