Stanford, CA— Proteins are the machinery that accomplishes almost every task in every cell in every living organism. The instructions for how to build each protein are written into a cell’s DNA. But once the proteins are constructed, they must be shipped off to the proper place to perform their jobs. New work from a team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Munevver Aksoy and Arthur Grossman, describes a potentially new pathway for...

Stanford, CA— Proteins are the machinery that accomplishes almost every task in every cell in every living organism. The instructions for how to build each protein are written into a cell’s DNA. But once the proteins are constructed, they must be shipped off to the proper place to perform their jobs. New work from a team of scientists led by Carnegie’s Munevver Aksoy and Arthur Grossman, describes a potentially new pathway for...

Stanford, CA—When it comes to cellular architecture, function follows form. Plant cells contain a dynamic cytoskeleton which is responsible for directing cell growth, development, movement, and division. So over time, changes in the cytoskeleton form the shape and behavior of cells and, ultimately, the structure and function of the organism as a whole. New work led by Carnegie’s David Ehrhardt hones in on how one particular...

   This year's Department of Plant Biology retreat was held October 1st through 3rd at the beautiful Stanford Sierra Center at Fallen Leaf Lake, near Lake Tahoe, in the Sierra mountains. The retreat was attended by approximately 100 faculty, students, postdocs and support staff, representing nearly the entire Department. Keynote lectures were given by our new President Matt Scott on Hedgehog signaling in development, and by Stanford...

Today, three outstanding young scientists at Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology will receive the prestigious Barbara McClintock (Jelmer Lindeboom, Ehrhardt lab and Luke Mackinder, Jonikas lab) and Cecil & Ida Green Senior Fellow (Lina Duan, Dinneny lab) for their outstanding work and as an incentive to continue to pursue courageous scientific endeavors in their future careers.