Washington, D.C.--Plant Biology postdoctoral research associate since 2012, Jia-Ying Zhu was awarded the sixth PIE award for her creativity, productivity, being a great team player in research, “and also an active and caring member of the Carnegie Department of Plant Biology (DPB) community.” The Postdoctoral Innovation and Excellence Awards are made through nominations from the department directors and chosen by the Office of the President....

Stanford, CA—(May 18th, 2017) Middle School students from the Children's Day School in San Francisco will spend the afternoon with plants learning about how they shape our past, present, and the future. Students will meet Teosinte, a wild grass thought to be the ancestor of Maize. A hands-on demonstration by Margaret Bezrutczyk will reveal how maize was domesticated. Heike Lindner and Jacob Moe-Lange will use interactive methods to...

Stanford, CA—Recently, Heike Lindner, Ximena Anleu Gil and Therese Suren LaRue led a group of 15 high school girls from around the country for a tour of Carnegie Science labs. The students loved meeting Heike, Ying and Threse, touring the work space, hearing about their research and their career paths. The GAINS Network is a school-based virtual community for high school girls interested in STEM topics. It is a place where high school girls...

Impact factor is often used as a metric to rank the quality or importance of various scientific journals. However, this has led to judging the quality of scientific research based on where it is published, rather than what the studies themselves show. The journal eLife has called for a stop to promoting impact factor in order to curb this trend. Neil E. Robbins II, a graduate student in Jose Dinneny's lab, begins a discussion on this through...

Palo Alto, CA—New work from a joint team of plant biologists and ecologists from Carnegie and Stanford University has uncovered the factor behind an important innovation that makes grasses—both the kind that make up native prairies and the kind we’ve domesticated for crops—among the most-common and widespread plants on the planet. Their findings may enable the production of plants that perform better in warmer and dryer climate conditions, and...