Articles

Stanford, CA— With a growing world population and a changing climate, understanding how agriculturally important plants respond to drought is crucial. New work from a team led by Carnegie’s José Dinneny discovers a strategy employed by grasses in drought conditions that could potentially be harnessed to improve crop productivity. It is published by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Plants obtain most of their water through their...
Stanford, CA— Plants have tiny pores on their leaves called stomata—Greek for mouths—through which they take in carbon dioxide from the air and from which water evaporates. New work from the lab of Dominique Bergmann, honorary adjunct staff member at Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology and professor at Stanford University, reveals ways that the systems regulating the development of stomata in grasses could be harnessed to improve plant...
We are seeking an exceptional, early-career scientist (recent PhD/early postdoctoral) in the field of computational biology for the position of staff associate. The candidate should have the creativity, tenacity and discipline to explore original and innovative ideas. We are seeking a colleague who has, through unconventional research, a potential to create new fields and/or revolutionary technologies. We expect the new member to interact...
Yanniv Dorone, a graduate student in Director Sue Rhee’s lab, has been awarded a prestigious Stanford Graduate Fellowship. These two-year fellowships offer more than $150,000 in financial and career development support and are “awarded to only the very best students in the sciences and engineering.” Dorone’s research aims to identify and characterize unknown methods by which plants orchestrate gene activity through regulating the...
Stanford, CA— Algae may hold the key to feeding the world’s burgeoning population. Don’t worry; no one is going to make you eat them. But because they are more efficient than most plants at taking in carbon dioxide from the air, algae could transform agriculture. If their efficiency could be transferred to crops, we could grow more food in less time using less water and less nitrogen fertilizer. New work from a team led by Carnegie’s Martin...
Stanford, CA— Four additional members of Stanford University’s faculty have been named Honorary Adjunct Staff Scientists at Carnegie’s Department of Plant Biology. Stanford’s Dominique Bergmann has been a Carnegie adjunct since 2011, and the newly added adjunct staff brings the total number with this honorary title to five. “For decades, Carnegie has shared not only ideas, but also access to equipment and mentorship of bright young scientists...
Stanford, CA— You’ve probably seen news stories about the highly lauded, much-discussed genome editing system CRISPR/Cas9. But did you know the system was actually derived from bacteria, which use it to fight off foreign invaders such as viruses? It allows many bacteria to snip and store segments of DNA from an invading virus, which they can then use to “remember” and destroy DNA from similar invaders if they are encountered again. Recent work...
Stanford, CA— During the daytime, plants convert the Sun’s energy into sugars using photosynthesis, a complex, multi-stage biochemical process. New work from a team including Carnegie’s Mark Heinnickel, Wenqiang Yang, and Arthur Grossman identified a protein needed for assembling the photosynthetic apparatus that may help us understand the history of photosynthesis back in the early days of life on Earth, a time when oxygen was not abundant in...
Washington, DC— More than 1,000 scientists from nonprofit, corporate, academic, and private institutions say public doubts about genetically modified food crops are hindering the next Green Revolution. In a letter published in the journal Science, six researchers from three institutions explain their recent petition in support of science-based criteria in guiding the safe and effective employment of genetic modification (GM) technology. The...