Articles

Stanford, CA. The Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology today announced the launch of a new web-based resource that promises to help researchers around the world meet increasing demands for food production, animal feed, biofuels, industrial materials, and new medicines. It is the Plant Metabolic Network (PMN) at http://www.plantcyc.org/ “To use plants to their full potential, it is crucial to understand the chemical reactions...
Stanford, CA—Curators at one of the world’s most widely used biological databases, The Arabidopsis Information Resource, or TAIR, have joined forces with the journal Plant Physiology, to solve the “flood of information” dilemma. It is a first-of-its-kind partnership, which cuts out the middle person for entering important genetics and other biological data about plants into the database. The new system will unclog the information highway and...
Stanford, CA — A startling discovery by scientists at the Carnegie Institution puts a new twist on photosynthesis, arguably the most important biological process on Earth. Photosynthesis by plants, algae, and some bacteria supports nearly all living things by producing food from sunlight, and in the process these organisms release oxygen and absorb carbon dioxide. But two studies by Arthur Grossman and colleagues*+ reported in Biochimica et...
Genes of a tiny, single-celled green alga called Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may contain scores more data about the common ancestry of plants and animals than the richest paleontological dig. This work is described in an article in the October 12, 2007, issue of Science.   A group of researchers*, including Arthur Grossman of the Carnegie Institution, report on the results of a major effort to obtain the full library of genes, or the genome...
Stanford, CA-- A team, led by researchers at the Carnegie Institution,* has found a key biochemical cycle that suppresses the immune response, thereby allowing cancer cells to multiply unabated. The research shows how the biomolecules responsible for healthy T-cells, the body’s first defenders against hostile invaders, are quashed, permitting the invading cancer to spread. The same cycle could also be involved in autoimmune diseases such as...
Plant Biology's Winslow R. Briggs, was awarded the 2007 Adolph E. Gude, Jr., Award. The award was established by the American Society of Plant Biologists and first given in 1983. It is made triennially to a scientist or lay person in recognition of outstanding service to the science of plant biology. The Carnegie Institution of Washington, a private nonprofit organization, has been a pioneering force in basic scientific research since 1902. It...
Carnegie Contact: Dr. Winslow Briggs; (650) 325-1521 x207 or briggs@stanford.edu For a copy of the paper, please contact: AAAS Office of Public Programs; (202) 326-6440 or scipak@aaas.org Stanford, CA - Certain types of bacteria have sunlight-sensing molecules similar to those found in plants, according to a new study. Surprisingly, at least one species-responsible for causing the flu-like disorder Brucellosis-needs light to maximize its...
Contact: Dominique Loqué at 650/325-1521, x 249, dloque@stanford.edu; or Wolf Frommer at 650/325-1521, x 208, wfrommer@stanford.edu For a copy of the paper contact Nature magazine h.jamison@nature.com Stanford, CA—Biologists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology have discovered a new way that plant cells govern nutrient regulation—neighboring pore-like structures at the cell’s surface physically interact to control the...
Plant Biology's Shauna Somerville has been elected a 2006 Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)