Articles

Washington, D.C. – Christopher Somerville, Director of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology, has been awarded the 2006 Balzan Prize in Plant Molecular Genetics, which he will share with his longtime collaborator, Elliot Meyerowitz of the California Institute of Technology. The International Balzan Foundation announced the winners on September 4, 2006, in Milan, Italy. The prize committee recognized Somerville and Meyerowitz “...
Stanford, CA – Cellulose—a fibrous molecule found in all plants—is the most abundant biological material on Earth. It is also a favored target of renewable, plant-based biofuels research. Despite overwhelming interest, scientists know relatively little about how plant cells synthesize individual cellulose fibers. However, recent work from the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology and Stanford University describes the first real-time...
Stanford, CA – Scientists at the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Plant Biology have found that photosynthetic bacteria living in scalding Yellowstone hot springs have two radically different metabolic identities. As the sun goes down, these cells quit their day job of photosynthesis and unexpectedly begin to fix nitrogen, converting nitrogen gas (N2) into compounds that are useful for cell growth. The study, published January 30 in the...
Carnegie Contact: Dr. Shauna Somerville; ssomerville@stanford.edu or (650) 325-1521 ext. 257 Or Mónica Stein; msteinc@stanford.edu or (650) 325-1521 ext. 406 For a copy of the paper contact Science at scipak@aaas.org, or 202-326-6440 For image see http://www.carnegieinstitution.org/genedefenders/   Stanford, CA – Like waves of soldiers guarding a castle gate, multiple genetic defenders...
  Contact Sakiko Okumoto at 650-325-1521 x 636, sokumoto@stanford.edu; Wolf Frommer at 650-325-1521 x 208,wfrommer@stanford.edu; or Chris Somerville 650-325-1521 x 203,crs@stanford.edu   Stanford, CA. – Until now it has been impossible to accurately measure the levels of important chemicals in living brain cells in real time and at the level of a single cell. Scientists at the...
Contact Zhi-Yong Wang at Carnegie's Department of Plant Biology, 650-325-1521 ext. 205, or via e-mail at zywang24@stanford.edu Copies of the embargoed paper may be obtained from the AAAS at 202-326-6440, or scipak@aaas.org   Stanford, CA – Both plant and animal growth is controlled by steroid hormones-signaling molecules that tell specific genes in cells to begin the physiological process of increasing cell...