Articles

Researchers and friends from around the world gathered on June 24th and 25th at the Department of Plant Biology to celebrate the achievements of Carnegie's Arthur Grossman with a symposium in his honor. Grossman's many contributions include major advances in our molecular understanding of how photosynthetic organisms acclimate to changes in their environment; as well as training several generations of scientists, many of who are now leaders in...
Young investigator Martin Jonikas has broad ambitions: to transform our fundamental understanding of photosynthetic organisms by developing game-changing tools. In the long run, his lab aims to increase photosynthetic efficiency of crops, which could improve food production around the world. When photosynthesis first evolved, the atmosphere contained much more carbon dioxide and much less oxygen than it does today. As a result, the...
Washington, DC— Carnegie’s Zhiyong Wang will receive the Humboldt Research Award, one of Germany’s most-prestigious prizes. Granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation up to 100 times each year, the award honors academics “whose fundamental discoveries, new theories, or insights have had a significant impact on their own discipline and who are expected to continue producing cutting-edge achievements in the future.” Alexander von Humboldt...
Stanford, CA— New work from a team including Carnegie’s Devaki Bhaya and Michelle Davison used massive DNA sequencing of bacterial populations that grow in the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park to determine their genetic diversity and explore the underlying evolutionary dynamics. They found an unexpectedly high degree of sharing and exchange of genetic material between the tiny, green, photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechococcus, which are...
The aim of these courses is to introduce graduate students to the principles of scientific communication: writing a journal paper; making an effective scientific conference poster; and making a professional seminar or conference oral presentation of complex scientific material. The presenter is multi-disciplinary and the courses are adapted to each graduate school.       Heather Silyn-Roberts, BSc, PhD Department of...
Stanford, CA— Carnegie’s David Ehrhardt has been awarded an honorary fellowship of the Royal Microscopical Society. It was announced during the society’s Botanical Microscopy 2015 meeting at Exeter University. Potential fellows must be nominated and recommended by five or more current fellows, of which there are never more than 65 at any given time. The proposed honoree is then put before the society’s council, which approves or rejects the...
Stanford, CA—A plant's roots grow and spread into the soil, taking up necessary water and minerals. The tip of a plant's root is a place of active cell division followed by cell elongation, with different zones dedicated to different functions, all working together to expand into new depths of the soil. Achieving an optimal root growth rate is critical for plant survival under drought conditions, as well as for maximizing resource allocation to...

The Newsletter of the American Society of Plant Biologists has asked Winslow Briggs to write an overview of his career. Winslow provides a beautiful overview over his post-retirement career, or better said, his two careers—his first as a scientist and his second as a ranger at the Henry W. Coe Park in California, which has led to new scientific projects in his active research lab.

Stanford, CA— Inside every seed is the embryo of a plant, and in most cases also a storage of food needed to power initial growth of the young seedling. A seed consists mainly of carbohydrates and these have to be is transported from the leaf where they are assimilated into the seed’s outer coat from the parent plant and then accessed by the embryo. If not enough food is delivered, the seeds won’t have the energy to grow when it’s time to...